Trace fossils of Fort Hays Limestone Member of Niobrara Chalk (Upper Cretaceous), west-central Kansas
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Trace fossils of Fort Hays Limestone Member of Niobrara Chalk (Upper Cretaceous), west-central Kansas

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Published by University of Kansas in [Lawrence] .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Paleontology -- Cretaceous.,
  • Paleontology -- Kansas.

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementRobert W. Frey.
SeriesUniversity of Kansas paleontological contributions -- 53, University of Kansas publications, Cretaceous -- article 2, State Geological Survey of Kansas series
The Physical Object
Pagination41 p., 10 p. of plates :
Number of Pages41
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL20296756M

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Trace fossils of Fort Hays Limestone Member of Niobrara Chalk (Upper Cretaceous), west-central KansasCited by: Frey, R. W., , Trace fossils of Fort Hays Limestone Member of Niobrara Chalk (Upper Cretaceous), west-central Kansas: University of Kansas Paleontological Contributions, Art. 53 (Cretaceous 2), 41 p. Flag as Inappropriate. Most terrigenous clastic sequences have calcareous equivalents, and trace fossil suites well known from terrigenous clastic sediments have their counterparts in by:

Chalk (Upper Cretaceous) of western Kansas. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 21(supp. 3): Hamm, S.A. & Shimada, K. Associated tooth set of the late Cretaceous lamniform shark, Scpanorhyncus raphiodon (Mitsukurinidae), from the Niobrara Chalk of western Kansas. Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science. Skeletal Limestone. Diagenesis. Depositional Environment. Regional Setting and Stratigraphic Framework of Smoky Hill Deposition. Origin of Chalk Components. Physical Aspects of the Environment. General Statement. Depth of Deposition Temperature. Substrates and Bottom Conditions. Salinity. Paleoecology of Macroinvertebrate Fossils. Preservation. Inoceramids. Radiolitids. It is composed of two structural units, the Smoky Hill Chalk Member overlying the Fort Hays Limestone Member. The chalk formed from the accumulation of coccoliths from microorganisms living in what was once the Western Interior Seaway, an inland sea that divided the continent of North America during much of the Cretaceous. It underlies much of the Great Plains of the US and y: Canada, United States. Synopsis. Trace fossils have great paleoecologic utility because they are (1) widespread in space and time, (2) found in place, and (3) largely the record of animal behavior and response, making them ideal indicators of environmental conditions. Traces may be used together with body fossils to increase knowledge of taxonomic richness in an ancient Cited by:

In the eastern part of the seaway where clastic input was minimal, chalks and limestone are the principal lithologies of the Niobrara in the Denver Basin of eastern Colorado (Pollastro and Scholle, ). Formal members of the Niobrara include the Fort Hays Limestone. “Stratigraphy, ichnology, and paleoecology of the Fort Hays Limestone Member of the Niobrara Chalk (Upper Cretaceous) in Trego County, Kansas” stands, along with Richard Osgood’s “Trace fossils of the Cincinnati area”, as a benchmark in the development of ichnology in North America. The Fort Hays Limestone Member of the Niobrara Chalk has been quarried for structural stone at numerous localities in Trego County. The Fort Hays is relatively soft, although it hardens upon weathering. The Fort Hays also tends to absorb water and thus to deteriorate through freeze-and-thaw action and from es: Non-conformably, Codell Sandstone, Blue Hill . Coprolites. Interesting trace fossils found in the Niobrara Formation are coprolites or petrified animal waste. Coprolites (caw-pro-lites) come in various sizes, shapes and colors and many have pieces of bone and small vertebrae in them. Very large ones are probably from either Xiphactinus fish or .